La’au Lapa’au | Bergamot Orange – March Herb of the Month

What do Earl Gray tea, the confection Turkish Delight, the liqueur Bergamia, eau de cologne, and some air fresheners have in common? The answer is: the essential oil from the bergamot orange, Citrus ×bergamia, The Herb Society of America’s Herb of the Month for March.  […]

Source: Bergamot Orange – March Herb of the Month

La’au Lapa’au | Essential Oil Spotlight: Clove Oil

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Clove oil uses are incredibly impressive, ranging from improving blood circulation and reducing inflammation to helping acne and boosting gum health. One of the best-known clove oil uses is to reduce the pain associated with dental problems. Even mainstream toothpaste makers agree that clove oil reduces the pain and swelling that comes with a toothache.

In addition to being a proven anti-inflammatory and pain reducer, one of the common clove oil uses is as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial to keep countless diseases at bay, which is why it can be such a wise choice for boosting your immune system as well as a powerful addition to homemade cleaning products.

Plant Origin of Clove Oil

Indigenous to Indonesia and Madagascar, clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) can be found in nature as the unopened pink flower buds of the tropical evergreen tree. Picked by hand in late summer and again in winter, the buds…

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Aloha Pō’ahā

Aloha kākōu ā me aloha kākahiāka. Kona kūpanaha Pō’ahā. Hō’oūna aloha ī nā mea a pau o’ ōukōu. Loāʻa hē nūi lā a me hōʻomau minoʻāka kākōu. Ō kā maluhia nō me ʻoe.

Hello and good morning. It’s a wonderful Thursday. Sending aloha to all of you. Have a great day and keep smiling, everyone. Peace be with you.

La’au Lapa’au | Food as Medicine: Black Elderberry (Sambucus nigra, Adoxaceae)

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Plants commonly known as elder belong to the genus Sambucus and consist of 20-30 species of deciduous trees and shrubs in the Adoxaceae, or moschatel, family.1-3 Sambucus species are native to forested temperate and subtropical climates and grow to an average height of 32 feet (10 m).1,3 Elder shrubs have light brown or gray stippled bark and narrow, dark green pinnately compound leaves with five to nine toothed leaflets.2,4 In early summer, elder plants produce flat to roundish clusters of tiny, cream-white, saucer-shaped flowers. Depending on the species, the clusters of small fruits, botanically characterized as drupes, are blue-black, black, or red (and rarely, yellow or white).2,3 The only elder species with a history of culinary use are those that produce blue-black or black fruits. Elder species are highly adaptable and readily naturalize in an area, making them potentially invasive outside their native range.3 This…

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Lāʻau Lāpaʻau | Health Benefits of Chaga Mushroom

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Chaga mushrooms contain a wide variety of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients.
The Chaga mushroom grows on birch trees throughout the northern hemisphere. It resembles a dark clump of dirt more than a mushroom but is distinguished from other growths by its orange tissue.

Doctors, alternative medicine advocates, and researchers are increasingly interested in the potential health benefits of the Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus). Some studies on Chaga mushrooms have yielded promising results.

chaga

Nine potential benefits

In this article, we look at the potential health benefits of Chaga mushrooms and the research behind the claims.

1. Nutrient-dense superfood

Chaga mushrooms are rich in a wide variety of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients, including:

  • B-complex vitamins
  • vitamin D
  • potassium
  • rubidium
  • cesium
  • amino acids
  • fiber
  • copper
  • selenium
  • zinc
  • iron
  • manganese
  • magnesium
  • calcium

2. Preventing and fighting cancer

Some studies suggest that Chaga mushrooms may slow the growth of certain cancer cells.

Increasingly, researchers are taking…

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Lāʻau Lāpaʻau | Mushrooms Boost Brain Power

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

If you’re a fan of mushrooms, rejoice! These nutritious little fungi have several known benefits to our health, including lowering your chance of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. And now, there appears to be yet another advantage to eating mushrooms. New research shows that they may help protect the brain from degenerative conditions such as dementia.

The study, which took place at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, found that regular consumption of certain types of mushrooms may be associated with brain changes that reduce the risk of developing dementia.1 After analyzing 10 different types of mushrooms, the investigators determined that they promoted the increased production of nerve growth factors in the brain, which contributes to the formation of new neurons in the gray matter, an important factor in our ability to retain and retrieve memories.

The Mushroom Course

What kinds of mushrooms were most beneficial? Unfortunately, not the white or…

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Nā ʻŌhana | Traditional Indigenous Kinship Practices at Home:  Being Child-Centered During the Pandemic

In our traditional kinship systems, children were the at the center of the family system. Everything we did was with, and for, the children. Women had babies on their back, breasts, and hips while […]

Source: Traditional Indigenous Kinship Practices at Home: Being Child-Centered During the Pandemic

Urban Gardening | 8 Vegetables You Can Grow In Your Tiny Apartment All Year Round

Growing Your Own Vegetable is Not Only Fun but you’ll know What Exactly Went into the plants at every stage which is not the case with store bought food. While growing plants in a busy city and apartment might seem like an impossible-task, There are fruits and veggies you can grow in pots that can sit pretty on a super small-porch, fire-escape, or even in a well-lit indoor area. And, unlike traditional gardens, you won’t have to deal with many intrusive weeds either!

NOTE: The materials and the information contained on Natural ways channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provide.

Lāʻau Lāpaʻau | LAVENDER’S MEDICINAL AND AROMATHERAPY USES

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

There are few scents in this world that evoke the feeling of clean – lavender is one of them. Its common and scientific name originates from lavare, the Latin word for wash or bathe. Lavender was popular as a linen-washing herb in Europe, no doubt due to its pleasant aroma, but it also possesses antiseptic qualities and can help to keep insects at bay. Discouraging or killing insects was paramount before the invention of glass windows and screens, a time when humans often shared the same roof with flea and lice-ridden livestock. Maude Grieve writes in A Modern Herbal (no longer especially modern, as it was written in 1931):

Dried Lavender flowers are still greatly used to perfume linen, their powerful, aromatic odour acting also as a preventative to the attacks of moths and other insects. In America, they find very considerable employment for disinfecting hot rooms and keeping away…

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Lāʻau Lāpaʻau | The Essence of Ginger

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

No modern medication can rival the range and variety of therapeutic effects that can be induced by ginger. However, the full awareness of the health benefits and value of the herbal ginger remedies is rather limited because of the monopolistic health-care systems and a historically biased regulatory environment in most countries. Out of the hundreds of species in the plant family Zingiberaceae, the ginger remains the most famous and popular herb. Ginger is a rhizome, according to the correct botanical classification, though the underground stem of the ginger is often mistaken to be a root. Many different varieties of the ginger herb exist in the wild and in cultivation, these varieties range from mild to spicy in taste, and all of them require tropical conditions and fertile soils to grow at an optimal rate. The ginger herb has traveled out from Southeast Asia to the new world, over a period…

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