Meditation | Pranayama: Learning the Art of Balanced Breathing

… Balance is the naked truth of nature and this quote holds true especially in case of breath. As the great yogis say, we are the breath we inhale & exhale, the fine line between how much to hold in and how much to let go, creates the necessary ‘equilibrium’. […]

Read article here: https://fractalenlightenment.com/32433/spirituality/pranayama-learning-the-art-of-balanced-breathing

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 20, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 20, 2019 — jaggati — to watch, to lie awake, to watch over, i. e. to tend, to nourish, rear, bring up

Attā hi attano nātho;
ko hi nātho paro siyā?
Attanā hi sudantena,
nāthaṃ labhati dullabhaṃ.

One truly is the protector of oneself;
who else could the protector be?
With oneself fully controlled,
one gains a mastery that is hard to gain.

Dhammapada 12.160
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Spirituality | On Tantra, by Veeru Ram

Tantra and Supernatural Power

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Anand Marg_The Path of Bliss

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The science of spirituality developed out of human beings’ innate desire to unravel the mystery of creation. Humans began to search for the secret causes underlying both the dreadful and the beautiful aspects of nature. They looked around them at the rivers and streams, the far-flung mountain ranges, the flashes of lightning; they heard the thunder; they listened to the roaring of ferocious animals – and they began to plumb the depths of these mysteries. These endeavours to get at the hidden truth of everything are what is known as Tantra. Since these endeavours were carried on at different times, in different places, and by different groups of individuals, we find some differences in methodology among the various schools of Tantra.

Tantra originated in [South] Asia, and its propounders were the Austrics, [the Dravidians,] and the Mongolians.(1) Among these peoples, the Dravidians and the Mongolians were more developed, the Austrics less. The practitioners of the more-developed Tantra would look upon things from a broad point of view, renouncing all narrow thinking. They would always strive hard to advance the welfare of the masses. Through such selfless service, they would overcome the fetters of the mind, such as hatred and shame. The practitioners of the less-developed Tantra would behave in just the opposite way. They would indulge in casteism; in expressions of untouchability; and in expressions of hatred and envy in relation to other groups.

The overcoming of material bondages signifies the greatest human progress. The word tantra signifies that one “frees oneself from the bondages of crudity;” therefore Tantra is considered the best kind of spiritual practice. Lord Sadáshiva was the first propounder of this Tantra. He developed certain fixed rules, and thereby ensured all-round progress in the different aspects of human life. He brought about a perfect system, reviewing and coordinating all branches of Tantra. He researched and proved the efficacy of both the [external] and the [internal] aspects of Tantra.(2) The [external] aspect of Tantra consisted of sádhaná with skulls, in cemeteries. The [internal] aspect of Tantra consisted of the practice of yoga. [It is ultimately] through [internal] Tantra that human beings can reach the heights of spiritual success.

Human beings can never win liberation by flattering Prakrti. An entity which is flattered becomes proud. Human beings must not become the slaves of matter. If sádhakas will worship Puruśa and ignore Prakrti, they will find that Prakrti will automatically begin to flatter them.There is no such thing as “supernatural” in this world. All sorts of powers lie dormant in human beings. Sometimes we get glimpses of these latent powers. In a more-developed terminology, these glimpses will be called “intellect” or “intuition”. Human beings can develop that which they have glimpsed, eventually attaining extraordinary powers. In the eyes of ordinary people, these powers appear to be supernatural, but actually they are natural. But it is a fact that ordinary persons cannot do these extraordinary things, and that is why they look upon these powers as supernatural.

Tantra is a source of such extraordinary powers. Within a short period, all the páshas and ripus [fetters and enemies] which bind the mind become broken. As long as the mind is in bondage, it tends to move towards crude material objects; that is, the mind remains inextricably associated with matter. But once the bondages become snapped through the practice of Tantra, the mind becomes detached from those crude objects. This implies the elevation of human beings, because [it is through detachment that] physical, psychic, and spiritual progress becomes possible. Humans are predominantly-mental beings, and sometimes [certain of them] develop extraordinary intellect; because of their greater concentration of mind, their societies consider them to be a superior type of person.

When we talk about the ripus [enemies] of the mind, we mean only the [internal, or, innate] enemies.(3) For a human being to bring the ripus under perfect control signifies an important victory. Those persons who can do so attain greater control over the forces of matter, and can perform feats that in the eyes of the common masses betoken some kind of supernatural power.

In Tantra the endeavour to establish control over matter or over external forces is called avidyá sádhaná. And the practice which leads to self-realization is called vidyá sádhaná. And that branch of Tantra which is neither vidyá sádhaná nor avidyá sádhaná is called upavidyá sádhaná. Only vidyá sádhaná contributes to the welfare of humanity; the other two practices are merely a waste of time. Márańa, uccát́ana, sammohan, váshiikárańa, etc., come within the definition of avidyá sádhaná. The practice of avidyá leads to degradation. Sadáshiva, the original propounder of Tantra, collected and systematized all the branches of Tantra, but He did not encourage the practice of avidyá, because it is an inferior order of sádhaná. When people practise sádhaná in order to attain “supernatural” powers, their mental objects ultimately become crude, for after attaining such powers, they utilize them for self-aggrandizement or for revenge.

Vidyá sádhaná was almost extinct for the last 1200 years. And there are now only a handful of real Avidyá Tantrics left – the rest are charlatans and hypocrites. After death, these people will be reborn as worms and insects.

Human beings practise sádhaná in order to become one with Brahma, not to become ghosts or ghouls. To become one with Brahma, they must practise Vidyá Tantra, and not Avidyá Tantra. Of course through either kind of sádhaná, sádhakas gain freedom from the páshas and ripus. But the difference between the two sádhanás is that the practitioners of Vidyá Tantra channelize their spiritual powers towards the attainment of Paramátmá, whereas the practitioners of Avidyá Tantra utilize their acquired powers for mundane benefits. Through Vidyá Tantra one “binds” [wins] Paramátmá, while through Avidyá Tantra one binds [dominates] living beings. Vidyá Tantrics accept Paramátmá as their object of supreme adoration, and in order to become one with Him, they channelize all the powers they have acquired towards Him.

From a medical point of view also, Tantra sádhaná has its usefulness. In ancient times there were Vedic experts in áyurveda.(4) But as they were not Tantrics, they were handicapped in fully utilizing their medical knowledge to cure patients. Because of their prejudices – their hatred of certain groups, their belief in untouchability, their casteism, etc. – they would hesitate to touch the bodies of their patients; whereas the Tantric doctors, because of their control over [such enemies and fetters as] hatred, fear and shame, could render medical service in a proper way. The practices of dissection and surgery rested mainly in the hands of Tantric doctors.

July 1960, Muzaffarpur

Shrii shrii anandmurti ji

Universal Spiritual Master

For more Spiritual information, search Anandmarg, The Path of Bliss, in Google

Rumifications …

“We suppress our authenticity because we want to avoid the pain of not being loved. By suppressing our authenticity, we create suffering for ourselves. Then we get into situations in life, and relationships, which are not authentic, for the sake of attachment. Now, it’s inevitable, almost inevitable in many situations, that if a person moved towards authenticity, it’s going to create the pain of maybe losing or threatening an attachment. They are going to have to be able to handle that pain. If they can’t handle that pain, they are going to stay suppressing their authenticity, which means they are going to create more suffering for themselves. So there is no painless authenticity.”

~ Gabor Maté

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 19, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 19, 2019 — juṇhā — moonlight, a moonlit night, the bright fortnight of the month

Mettañca sabbalokasmi,
mānasaṃ bhāvaye aparimāṇaṃ:
Uddhaṃ adho ca tiriyañca,
asambādhaṃ averamasapattaṃ.

With good will for the entire cosmos,
cultivate a limitless heart:
Above, below, & all around,
unobstructed, without hostility or hate.

Sutta Nipāta 1.150
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 18, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 18, 2019 — jotaka — illuminating, making light; explaining

Attānaṃ ce tathā kayirā;
yathāññamanusāsati,
sudanto vata dametha.
Attā hi kira duddamo.

One should do what one teaches others to do;
if one would train others,
one should be well controlled oneself.
Difficult, indeed, is self-control.

Dhammapada 12.159
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

What is the ego tendency? || Acharya Prashant (2018)

Acharya Prashant - Words into Silence

What is the ego tendency

Question: What is ego tendency? What is maya? Why does the mind get distracted? How to be attentive?

Acharya Prashant: You see, we often say that suffering is when things start cluttering the mind. Kabir Sahib says, “Maya is that, which occupies your mind.” We need to ask, “To whom is the occupation?”

Let us say a girl keeps dancing in your mind. To whom is she dancing? Who is watching her? To whom has she come? Has she come to a nobody? Has she come to an empty house? She is dancing in your mind. To whom has she come? Had you not been there, would she have come? That’s the ego tendency.

Whenever you see something, you must that, that which you are seeing, is for you. Otherwise, it wouldn’t have been there. Your universe is, for you. Otherwise, it is not there. That…

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Daily Words of the Buddha for April 17, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 17, 2019 aniñjita — immoveable, undisturbed, unshaken, without desiress

Kalyāṇamitto yo bhikkhu, sappatisso sagāravo;
Karaṃ mittānaṃ vacanaṃ, sampajāno patissato;
Pāpuṇe anupubbena, sabbasaṃyojanakkhayaṃ.

When a bhikkhu has good friends, and is reverential and respectful;
Doing what one’s friends advise, clearly comprehending and mindful;
One may progressively attain the destruction of all fetters.

Itivuttaka 1.17
The Udāna and the Itivuttaka, trans. John D. Ireland

“TO BE EVERYTHING AND NOTHING AT THE SAME TIME”, by Adyashanti

Is it possible to start to feel, in this very moment, that our bodies, our minds, and even our personalities are ways through which our spiritual essence connects with the world around us? That these bodies and minds are actually sensing organs for spirit? Our physical forms are the vehicle through which spiritual essence gets to experience its own mysterious creation to be bewildered by its creation, shocked by it, in awe of it, and even confused by it. Spirit is pure potential that contains every possible outcome. From the standpoint of our spiritual essence, nothing is to be avoided. No experiences need to be turned from. Everything, in its way, is a gift even the painful things. In reality, all of life every moment, every experience is an expression of spirit.”

– Adyashanti

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 15, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 15, 2019 — ajjava — straight, upright, direct, honest

Phuṭṭhassa lokadhammehi,
cittaṃ yassa na kampati,
asokaṃ virajaṃ khemaṃ;
etaṃ maṅgalamuttamaṃ.

When faced with the vicissitudes of life,
one’s mind remains unshaken,
sorrowless, stainless, secure;
this is the greatest welfare.

Sutta Nipāta 2.271
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Interpreting Khalil Gibran: Even when you are lost, you are already Home

Acharya Prashant - Words into Silence

“The significance of a man is not in what he attains,

but rather what he longs to attain.”

-Khalil Gibran, ‘Sand and Foam’

Question: Once during a discourse on the Bible, you too have said, “The more you know the Truth, the more you want to know; such is the expanse of the Truth, infinite.” If this be so, then what is coming back to Home? What is this whole thing about coming back Home? Can one ever really be Home? Khalil Gibran seems to say that more than arriving at Home, it is the longing for Home which is important.

Acharya Prashant: Listen again to what Khalil Gibran says. He says, “The significance of a man is not in what he attains, but rather what he longs to attain.”

Man is a constant search, man is a restlessness; that is how man…

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Daily Words of the Buddha for April 14, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 14, 2019 — obhāsa — shine, splendour, light, lustre, effulgence

Aniccā vata saṅkhārā,
uppādavayadhammino.
Uppajjitvā nirujjhanti,
tesaṃ vūpasamo sukho.

Impermanent truly are compound things,
by nature arising and passing away.
If they arise and are extinguished,
their eradication brings happiness.

Dīgha Nikāya 2.221
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 13, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 13, 2019 tareti — to go or get through, to cross (a river), pass over, traverse; to get beyond, to surmount, overcome, esp. oghaṃ (the great flood of life, desire, ignorance, etc.)

Yato yato sammasati
khandhānaṃ udayabbayaṃ,
labhatī pītipāmojjaṃ,
amataṃ taṃ vijānataṃ.

Whenever and wherever one encounters
the arising and passing away of the mental-physical structure,
one enjoys bliss and delight,
[which lead on to] the deathless stage experienced by the wise.  

Dhammapada 25.374
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 12, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 12, 2019 — uddhaja — upright, honest

Khīṇaṃ purāṇaṃ nava
natthi sambhavaṃ,
virattacittāyatike bhavasmiṃ.
Te khīṇabījā, avirūḷhichandā.
Nibbanti dhīrā yathāyaṃ padīpo.

When past conditioning is released
and no fresh one produced,
the mind no longer seeks for future birth.
The seed consumed, cravings no more arise.
Such-minded wise ones cease like [the flame of] this lamp.

Sutta Nipāta 2.238
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 12, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 12, 2019 — uddhaja — upright, honest

Khīṇaṃ purāṇaṃ nava
natthi sambhavaṃ,
virattacittāyatike bhavasmiṃ.
Te khīṇabījā, avirūḷhichandā.
Nibbanti dhīrā yathāyaṃ padīpo.

When past conditioning is released
and no fresh one produced,
the mind no longer seeks for future birth.
The seed consumed, cravings no more arise.
Such-minded wise ones cease like [the flame of] this lamp.

Sutta Nipāta 2.238
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 11, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 11, 2019 opasamika — upa + sama + ika = prefix denoting nearness or close touch, under & on, approach from below + calmness, tranquillity, mental quiet = leading to quiet, allaying, quieting

Anekajātisaṃsāraṃ
sandhāvissaṃ, anibbisaṃ
gahakāraṃ gavesanto;
dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ.
Gahakāraka! Diṭṭhosi.

Puna gehaṃ na kāhasi.
Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā,
gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ.
Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ:
taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā.

Through countless births in the cycle of existence
I have run, not finding
although seeking the builder of this house;
and again and again I faced the suffering of new birth.
Oh housebuilder! Now you are seen.

You shall not build a house again for me.
All your beams are broken,
the ridgepole is shattered.
The mind has become freed from conditioning:
the end of craving has been reached.

Dhammapada 11.153, 11.154
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 10, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 10, 2019 — nibbhaya — free from fear or danger, fearless, unafraid

Idha tappati, pecca tappati,
pāpakārī ubhayattha tappati.
“Pāpaṃ me katan”ti tappati,
bhiyyo tappati, duggatiṃ gato.

Idha nandati, pecca nandati,
katapuñño ubhayattha nandati.
“Puññaṃ me katan”ti nandati,
bhiyyo nandati, suggatiṃ gato.

Agony now, agony hereafter,
the wrong-doer suffers agony in both worlds.
Agonized now by the knowledge that one has done wrong,
one suffers more agony, gone to a state of woe.

Rejoicing now, rejoicing hereafter,
the doer of wholesome actions rejoices in both worlds.
Rejoicing now in the knowledge that one has acted rightly,
one rejoices more, gone to a state of bliss.

Dhammapada 1.17, 1.18
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 08, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 08, 2019 — niraggaḷa — unobstructed, free

Sabbo ādīpito loko,
sabbo loko padhūpito;
Sabbo pajjalito loko,
sabbo loko pakampito.

Akampitaṃ apajjalitaṃ,
aputhujjanasevitaṃ,
agati yattha mārassa —
tattha me nirato mano.

The entire world is in flames,
the entire world is going up in smoke;
the entire world is burning,
the entire world is vibrating.

But that which does not vibrate or burn,
which is experienced by the noble ones,
where death has no entry–
in that my mind delights.

Saṃyutta Nikāya 1.168
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 07, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 07, 2019 — upasama — still, calm, quiet

Tumhehi kiccamātappaṃ;
Akkhātāro Tathāgatā.
Paṭipannā pamokkhanti
jhāyino mārabandhanā.

You have to do your own work;
Enlightened Ones will only show the way.
Those who practise meditation
will free themselves from the chains of death.

Dhammapada 20.276
The Discourse Summaries by S.N. Goenka

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 06, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 06, 2019 — anuttara — an + uttara = nothing + higher, without a superior, incomparable, second to none, unsurpassed, excellent, preeminent, the unexcelled

Sace bhāyatha dukkhassa, sace vo dukkhamappiyaṃ,
mākattha pāpakaṃ kammaṃ, āvi vā yadi vā raho.
Sace ca pāpakaṃ kammaṃ, karissatha karotha vā,
Na vo dukkhā pamutyatthi:
upeccapi palāyataṃ.

If you fear pain, if you dislike pain,
don’t do an evil deed in open or secret.
If you’re doing or will do an evil deed,
you won’t escape pain:
it will catch you even as you run away.

Udāna 5.44
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 05, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 5, 2019 — nirupatāpa — untroubled, without vexation

Gahakāraka, diṭṭhosi!
Puna gehaṃ na kāhasi.
Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ.
Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ;
taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā.

O house-builder, you are seen!
You will not build this house again.
For your rafters are broken and your ridgepole shattered.
My mind has reached the Unconditioned;
I have attained the destruction of craving.

Dhammapada 11.154
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 04, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for March 4, 2019 sītibhāva — cold, cool + condition, nature, becoming = to become cooled, calm, tranquillized

Māvoca pharusaṃ kañci,
vuttā paṭivadeyyu taṃ.
Dukkhā hi sārambhakathā,
paṭidaṇḍā phuseyyu taṃ.

Speak not harshly to anyone,
for those thus spoken to might retort.
Indeed, angry speech hurts,
and retaliation may overtake you.

Dhammapada 10.133
The Dhammapada: The Buddha’s Path of Wisdom, translated from Pāli by Acharya Buddharakkhita

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 03, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 03, 2019 — bhūmi — ground, earth, region

Mātā yathā niyaṃ
puttamāyusā ekaputtamanurakkhe,
evampi sabbabhūtesu
mānasaṃ bhāvaye aparimāṇaṃ.

As a mother would risk her life
to protect her child, her only child,
even so should one cultivate a limitless heart
with regard to all beings.

Sutta Nipāta 1.149
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

RUMInations …

A moment of happiness,
you and I sitting on the veranda,
apparently two, but one in soul, you and I.

We feel the flowing water of life here,
you and I, with the garden’s beauty
and the birds singing.

The stars will be watching us,
and we will show them
what it is to be a thin crescent moon.

You and I unselfed, will be together,
indifferent to idle speculation, you and I.

The parrots of heaven will be cracking sugar
as we laugh together, you and I.

In one form upon this earth,
and in another form in a timeless sweet land.

— Rumi

Daily Words of the Buddha for April 02, 2019

Pāli Word a Day for April 02, 2019 — bujjhati — to be awake, to be enlightened, to perceive, to know, recognise, understand

Adhicetaso appamajjato,
munino monapathesu sikkhato:
Sokā na bhavanti tādino,
upasantassa sadā satīmato.

Exalted in mind & heedful,
the sage trained in sagacity’s ways:
One has no sorrows, one who is Such,
calmed & ever mindful.

Udāna 4.37
Translated from Pāli by Thanissaro Bhikkhu